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Tsunamis

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 18, 2015

When I was a child I did not ever hear the word 'tsunami'. But it was probably not that they did not occur then. We might reflect that tsunami is a Japanese word, and was only applied to events in Japanese waters. In a similar way, only the northern hermisphere gets "hurricanes", and only the Asian countries get "typhoons". Down here we call them cyclones. And in Japan they have always had tsunamis associated with large earthquakes because the depth of the Pacific juxtaposing with the largest land mass; Eurasia, causes them. So why have they apparently become more frequent worldwide in more recent years?
 
 The only thing that has changed has been the level of media scaremongering. Now it is just one more thing we can add to the list of things that can 'get' us, that list including earthquakes, cyclones, droughts, floods, planet warming, planet cooling, Bird Flu, Sars, sea level rise swamping all the cities, oceans turning to acid, and plastic supermarket bags destroying the oceans.
 
According to  http://www.mapsofworld.com/tsunami/ , in the 84 years between 1929-2013 there have been 25 registered tsunamis. They are listed below. In the first 40 years, to 1960, 9 or 10 had occurred. In the next 40 years to 2000, another 9 or 10. But in the last decade there have been a whopping 6. What has happened? During the 13 year gaps between 1933-1946 and between 1964-1976 no tsunamis were recorded. Now tsunamis are showing up almost every year.
 
It is because every time there is a large earthquake the media are now poised, salivating, hoping for a tsunami so they can gleefully report a certain number of deaths. This hoping makes it a media reality. Now even no tsunami is called one. The 20cm wave that arrived on NZ shores two days ago has been called a "small tsunami". But there is no such thing as a small tsunami. By definition a tsunami is a huge destructive tidal wave. 
Yes, Chile had one. We didn't.


Tsunamis recorded to 2013
1. Grand Banks  Atlantic Ocean off the south coast  129 km/h (80 mph) Nov 18, 1929  
2. Sanriku  Sanriku-kaigan, Japan 10 meters, height 2 kilometers long Mar 2, 1933
3. Aleutian Islands  Aleutian Islands, Alaska   Apr 1, 1946 
4. Severo-Kurilsk Pacific Ocean, Kamchatka 15–18 meters (49–59 ft) Nov 5, 1952 
5. Lituya Bay megatsunami Panhandle near Alaska, USA 30 metres (100 feet)  Jul 9, 1958 
6. Valdivia  Coast of South Central Chile 10.7 m (35 ft) waves measuring up to 25 meters high May 22, 1960 
7. Vajont Dam North of Venice, Italy 110 kilometres per hour (68 mph) Oct 9, 1963
8. Niigata  Honshu island, Japan (Niigata)   Jun 16, 1964 
9. Alaskan  South-Central Alaska ( USA) 100 feet (30 m) Mar 27, 1964 
10. Moro Gulf  Moro Gulf in Southern Mindanao( Philippines) 4 to 5 metres (13 to 16 ft) August 16, 1976 UTC August 17, 1976 
11. Tumaco  Tumaco, Colombia Three to four waves Dec 12, 1979  
12. Sea of Japan  Oga Peninsula (Sea of Japan) 10 meters (33 ft) May 26, 1983
13. Nicaragua  West Coasts of Nicaragua and Costa Rica 9.9 meters high Sep 2, 1992
14. Hokkaido  Okushiri Island (Sea of Japan) Maximum run-up of 32 M, 3.5 m at Akita in northern Honshu, Jul 12, 1993
15. Java  Coast of Indonesia 14 m (46 ft) east Java coast and up to 5 m (16 ft) Jun 3, 1994 
16. Papua New Guinea  Papua New Guinea Estimated at being 15 m (59 ft) high with an average height of 10.5 m (34 ft) Jul 17, 1998 
17. Indian Ocean - Sumatra Indian Ocean (Indonesia) 50 M 26. Dec. 2004 
18. Pangandaran  South Coast of Java Island, Indonesia South Java coast saw runup heights of 5–7 meters (16–23 ft),peak surge 69 ft, 17. Jul. 2006 
19. Kuril Islands  Kuril Islands Estimated tsunami waves to be as tall as 2 metres 15. Nov. 2006
20. Solomon Islands  Ghizo Island, in Solomon Islands 12 m (36 feet) 2. Apr. 2007 
21. Samoa  Samoan Islands 14 metres (46 ft) 29. Sep. 2009 
22. Chile  coast of Chile, Argentina 2.34 m (7.68 ft)  27. Feb. 2010 
23. Sumatra  Western Coast of Sumatra,Mentawai Islands (Indonesia) 3 m (9 ft) 25. Oct. 2010 
24. Tohoku  East Coast of Tohoku (Japan) 2 m (6.6 ft) 11. Mar. 2011 
25. Solomon Islands  Lata, Solomon Islands 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) 6. Feb. 2013


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